English Text

Testo Italiano



Making Whole What Has Been Smashed

                                                                                                            Drawing is taking a line for a walk
                                                                                                         
                                     -  Paul Klee

            "A Klee painting named Angelus Novus shows an angel looking as though he is about to move away from something he is fixedly contemplating.  His eyes are staring, his mouth is open, his wings are spread. This is how one pictures the angel of history.  His face is turned toward the past. Where we perceive a chain of events, he sees one single catastrophe which keeps piling wreckage and hurls it in front of his feet.  The angel would like to stay, awaken the dead, and make whole what has been smashed.  But a storm is blowing from Paradise; it has got caught in his wings with such violence that the angel can no longer close them.  This storm irresistibly propels him into the future to which his back is turned, while the pile of debris before him grows skyward. This storm is what we call progress.”  So wrote the philosopher Walter Benjamin in his  1939 “Theses on the Philosophy of History.”
            The constant change that drives us and the world surrounding us has shaped our nervous system in such a way that, through art, it is able to extract a kind of stability from that which is not stable. This stability, as the only consolation for this inevitability, saves us from our fate.
            This fate, combined with our extremely social nature, leads us – in every moment of our existence – to what we might call an obsession: the urge to communicate and to extract meaning from all that surrounds us. It is a vain attempt to oppose entropy, to recompose every detail into a perfectly coherent scene with the intent of forcing chaos into a semantic order and harmony.
            Riccardo Murelli responds to this human need with introspection.  With the silence of forms that signify nothing, he turns to lines - those lines that are the basic component from which all our visual perception springs - to harness his forms inside other forms. The result is an endless abstraction, neither contained nor defined by the frame or edge of the work. The frame of an incision, the perimeters of a sculpture, as well as the conceptual boundaries of an idea, not only delimit what is the work of art, but also delineate all that surrounds it.  They enclose the essence of the work while locking out the essence of infinity within which the work is immersed.
            This work recalls that geometric abstraction which Kazimir Malevich called Suprematism, the compositions of floating shapes in white, unstructured spaces - figures at the origin of the new pictorial language that freed art from representation.
            Murelli makes these images his own.  Each mark he leaves on paper, iron or film is a trace of his passing, a map of his world. It is as if an engraving's relief acted as evidence of Khlebnikov's transmental language – poetry in its primordial and magical function, lyrics through mere phonemes.
EROS

Emč’, Amč’, Umč’!

Dumči, damči, domči,

Makarako kiočerk!

Cicilici cicici!

Kukariki kikiku.

Rièi èièi ci-ci-ci.

Ol’ga, El’ga, Al’ga!

Pic, pač, poč’! Echamči!

(Velimir Khlebnikov, "Zangezi")

            Thinking back to Piet Mondrian and the lines that stretch beyond the canvas, the lines that precede the meanings and invite us to forget the concepts and to observe forms. We are compelled to remember that art is primarily a nonverbal language, and bridling it in verbal explanations remains reductive. We ought to let lines live, allowing them to remain free to represent the infinite possibilities of expression because they are the source from which every visual perception springs.
            Scientists have taught us that vision is not only the mere analysis of external stimuli that strike the eye and arrive in the brain.  It is also a process driven by our instincts in search of new knowledge and is always conditioned by an observer's inner state of being. To unravel the mysteries of this phenomenon in all its complexity, we find solace in the artist. The work of art and the creative process becomes the explicit and direct story of our visual experience – no longer imprisoned, and perhaps inaccurately belittled, by the boundaries of verbal explanation and the experimental context.
            Thus vision is an active process that requires the brain to search immutable elements needed to recognize the external world in its constant flux.  As Matisse wrote, "seeing is already a creative operation that requires effort."  Just as color changes according to its lighting, an object appears differently depending on the position in which it is presented.  Within this sight, however, the brain seeks out previously classified elements and associations through which it recognizes the world. Seeing results from the complex elaboration of different visual attributes in numerous cortical and subcortical areas of the brain.  The end result is the perception of a coherent scene of the outside world where different qualities and properties are seen as an organic whole. Many of the artists who sought to represent their way of perceiving things, sooner or later in their career, realized that to create an artistic image it is necessary to create consistent relationship between their perceptions, feelings and emotions. In 1890, Camille Pissarro wrote about it: "At forty, I began to understand my feelings, to know  what I was observing. At fifty, I formulated the idea of unity, but without being able to represent it. Now, at sixty, I begin to understand how to represent it "(Letter from Pissaro to Esther Isaacson, May 5, 1890). Many years before David Hubel and Torsten Wiesel's discovery of cells sensitive to a line's orientation in 1959, we must consider the basic components of form perception, Mondrian discovered the strongest form of expression through his lines in his “search for constant truths which compose a form.” Mondrian wrote that art "shows us the existence of necessary truths for composing forms" and that his works aims to represent "a reduction of complex forms into these constant elements."
            Over the past twenty years, there have been very important discoveries that have greatly simplified the study of the human brain. Subsequently there has been a radical change in the type of questions that scientists ask regarding the brain, as well as the way we look at the functions of the nervous system. Once you have come to realize that the brain is not a passive chronicler of what happens in the outside world, but an active participant that uses physical reality to create the world we experience.  We have also come to ask questions that seemed far too subjective to be the object of scientific inquiry. Issues such as the neural correlations of love, desire, beauty, or the physiological substrate of identity, empathy and social interaction have all become objects of study, especially after demonstrating brain activity corresponding to these states.  They can not only can be located, but also quantified, thereby allowing us to objectify the subjective feelings we experience.
            We can say, without much reservation, that the brain's main task is to acquire knowledge and it does so, among other functions, very efficiently. This efficiency is largely due to the brain using two types of concepts: inherited ones and acquired ones. Therefore, the inherited concepts organize signals for the brain so as to give them meaning and, hence, to understand them.  Acquired concepts, on the other hand, are generated by the brain during the course of life and allow it to remain relatively independent of the constant flux of information it takes in. The concepts acquired facilitate processes of perception and recognition, allowing us to gain an awareness of things and situations.
            To understand how our brains are able to acquire knowledge about the world around us,  neuroscience has gone to great lengths in recent years to highlight the specificity of cellular responses in different cortical areas. It has been found, for example, that the cells of the auditory cortex respond to auditory stimuli, the visual cortex to visual stimuli, and so on. Through such a strenuous affirmation on the specificity of cellular responses to different areas of the brain, neurophysiologists have, however, neglected another fundamental characteristic: the ability of these specific cells to make abstract, wherein abstraction means favoring more general characteristics over details.
            Let's take another glance at vision. The visual system that determines the perception of a form has a striking feature: in the visual areas, there are cells which are selective to orientation, meaning that they are only capable of responding to line oriented in a specific way. These cells are very specific with respect to the kinds of visual stimuli to which they react, but absolutely abstract the type of object that generates that type of orientation. A cell that responds to the vertical lines will respond to a pen, if presented vertically, a stick, a blue vertical line on a yellow background, the only thing that matters is that the visual stimulus is oriented vertically, regardless of that which it represents.
            Neurophysiologists consider these neurons to be the foundation for perceiving forms. They are present in the brain from birth (at least in monkeys) and thus represent an inherited organizational concept that determines how signals correlated to a form are grouped in the cortex, at least in the early stages of cortical system for processing forms.
            The lines are therefore truly the basis on which all our visual perception lay; they are the basis from which every formal possibility springs. Paul Klee wrote "drawing is taking a line for a walk." Riccardo Murelli forces us to walk between his lines, to walk around them, driven by the obsession to successfully extract meaning from them, to make sense of them.  We perceive the sculptures' voids which become solid fields on paper.  We seek behind, underneath, above, searching in our memory, in previous experiences from our past, in dreams, in architectonic volumes – with the hopes that three-dimensionality will speak to us.  Nothing.  We must abandon this idea, betraying this human instinct that guides our search for meaning, verbalizations, acknowledgements and abandon ourselves to silence and contemplation. Only then will we discover where ethics merge with aesthetics to transmit the only possible message: an artwork's meaning is not within us, but within the work's very essence.
            We human beings are naturally inclined to try to give form to everything around us, we recognize an object's silhouette in rocks, trees and clouds; we extract meaning from the most absurd noises, hear appeals in the rustling of leaves. But the true meaning of a form lay not in the face we recognize in a cloud or in the sky, but in the particles of water from which it is made, from the ice crystals and the wind that moves it – this is the only true meaning of that cloud. We even cast our dreams and emotions into forms.  This is the only way we have to know them, to keep them at bay, to exorcise them.
            As if all this were not enough, we to transpose these dreams, emotions and hopes onto forms.  This is our condemnation, our longing, our destiny.  Perhaps this is the reason for which art is so powerful.  We empathically recognize that which is most fleeting in an artwork and these are the things that are most difficult to verbalize: illusions, anxieties, fantasies, feelings, fears.  To stand before a work of art becomes an act of introspection, a way to contemplate and listen to ourselves, to gather the pieces of our own existence and make whole what has been smashed.




Ricomporre l’infranto

Drawing is taking a line for a walk

Paul Klee

“C'è un quadro di Klee che si intitola Angelus Novus. Vi si trova un angelo che sembra in atto di allontanarsi da qualcosa su cui fissa lo sguardo. Ha gli occhi spalancati, la bocca aperta, le ali distese. L'angelo della storia deve avere questo aspetto. Ha il viso rivolto al passato. Dove ci appare una catena di eventi, egli vede una sola catastrofe, che accumula senza tregua rovine su rovine e le rovescia ai suoi piedi. Egli vorrebbe ben trattenersi, destare i morti e ricomporre l’infranto. Ma una tempesta spira dal paradiso, che si è impigliata tra le sue ali, ed è così forte che egli non può più chiuderle. Questa tempesta lo spinge irresistibilmente nel futuro, a cui volge le spalle, mentre il cumulo delle rovine sale davanti a lui al cielo, ciò che chiamiamo il progresso è questa tempesta”. Così scriveva il filosofo Walter Benjamin nel 1939, nelle sue Tesi di filosofia della storia.

Il cambiamento continuo che trascina il mondo circostante e noi stessi ha modellato il nostro sistema nervoso in modo tale che esso riesce ad estrarre, con il tramite dell’arte, una sorta di stabilità da ciò che stabile non è. La stabilità che, come unica consolazione, ci salva dall’ineluttabilità del nostro destino.

Questo destino, unito alla nostra natura estremamente sociale, ci spinge, in ogni istante della nostra esistenza, verso quella che potremmo chiamare un’ ossessione: la smania di comunicare e di estrarre un significato da tutto ciò che ci circonda. È un vano tentativo di opporsi all’entropia, di ricomporre ogni dettaglio in una scena coerente del tutto con l’intento di forzare il caos in una sorta di ordine e armonia semantica.

Riccardo Murelli risponde a questo umano richiamo con l’introspezione, con il silenzio di forme che non significano nulla, torna alle linee - a quelle linee che sono la componente di base da cui scaturisce ogni nostra percezione visiva - per imbrigliare le sue forme all’interno di altre forme. Il risultato è un’astrazione senza fine, né contenuta né definita dalla cornice o dai bordi dell’opera. La cornice di un’incisione, i perimetri di una scultura, così come i confini concettuali di un’idea, non delimitano solo ciò che è l’opera d’arte, ma danno un limite anche a quel tutto che la circonda, chiudono dentro l’essenza dell’opera e fuori l’essenza dell’infinito in cui è immersa.

Ricorda l’astrazione geometrica che Kazimir Malevich chiamò Suprematismo, le composizioni di forme galleggianti in bianchi spazi destrutturati, figure all’origine del nuovo linguaggio pittorico che liberò l’arte dalla rappresentazione.

Murelli fa sue queste immagini, ogni segno che lascia sulla carta, sul ferro, sulla pellicola, è un’impronta, una traccia del suo passaggio, una mappa del suo mondo. È come se il rilievo nell’incisione fosse l’evidenza del linguaggio transmentale di Chlebnikov, della poesia nella sua primordiale funzione magica, delle liriche tramate di soli fonemi.

EROS

Emč’, Amč’, Umč’!

Dumči, damči, domči,

Makarako kiočerk!

Cicilici cicici!

Kukariki kikiku.

Rièi èièi ci-ci-ci.

Ol’ga, El’ga, Al’ga!

Pic, pač, poč’! Echamči!

(Velimir Chlebnikov, Zangezi)

Ripensiamo anche a Piet Mondrian, alle linee che oltrepassano i contorni delle tele, alle linee che precedono i significati, ci invitano a dimenticare i concetti e ad osservare le forme. Siamo forzati a ricordare che l’arte è un linguaggio innanzitutto non verbale, imbrigliarla dentro spiegazioni verbali risulta sempre riduttivo.

Bisogna lasciare che le linee vivano, che restino libere di rappresentare l’infinita potenzialità dell’espressione perché sono loro la sorgente da cui prende corpo ogni processo percettivo visivo.

Da scienziati sappiamo ormai che la visione non è solo una semplice analisi di stimoli esterni che colpiscono l’occhio e arrivano al cervello, ma è anche un processo guidato dal nostro istinto di ricerca di nuove conoscenze e sempre condizionato dallo stato emotivo interno della persona che osserva.  A svelare i misteri di questo fenomeno, in tutta la sua complessità, ci viene in aiuto l’artista. L’opera d’arte e il processo creativo diventano il racconto esplicito e diretto dell’esperienza visiva, non più imprigionata, e forse imprecisamente sminuita, dai confini della spiegazione verbale e del contesto sperimentale.

La visione è dunque processo attivo che richiede, da parte del cervello, una ricerca di elementi immutabili necessari per riconoscere il mondo esterno nel suo continuo cambiamento. Come scrisse Matisse “vedere è già un’operazione creativa che richiede uno sforzo”. Così come il colore cambia a seconda delle condizioni di illuminazione, un oggetto appare in modo diverso secondo la posizione in cui si presenta, ma il cervello cerca, nella scena visiva, quegli elementi costanti che, classificati e associati in base all’esperienza passata, gli permettono di riconoscere il mondo. Vedere è il risultato di una complicata elaborazione dei differenti attributi della scena visiva da parte di numerose aree corticali e subcorticali del nostro cervello, e il risultato finale è rappresentato dalla percezione di una scena coerente del mondo esterno, dove le diverse qualità e proprietà sono viste come un insieme organico. Molti degli artisti che cercarono di rappresentare il loro modo di percepire le cose, presto o tardi nella loro carriera, si resero conto che anche per creare un’immagine artistica coerente era necessario mettere in relazione tra loro percezioni, sensazioni ed emozioni. Nel 1890 Camille Pissaro scrisse a questo proposito: "A quarant’anni, ho cominciato a comprendere le mie sensazioni, a sapere cosa stavo guardando, ma soltanto vagamente. A cinquant’anni, ho formulato l’idea di unità, ma senza essere capace di rappresentarla. Adesso, a sessanta, comincio a capire come rappresentarla” (Lettera di Pissaro a Esther Isaacson, 5 Maggio, 1890). Molti anni prima della scoperta, ad opera di David Hubel e Torsten Wiesel nel 1959, di cellule sensibili all’orientamento delle linee, considerate le componenti di base della percezione della forma, Mondrian, nella sua “ricerca delle verità costanti che compongono la forma”, trovò nelle linee l’espressione più forte della sua arte. Mondrian scrisse che l’arte “ci mostra l’esistenza di verità necessarie alla composizione della forma” e che le sue opere mirano a rappresentare “una riduzione delle forme complesse a questi elementi costanti”. 

Negli ultimi vent’anni sono state fatte scoperte molto importanti che hanno notevolmente semplificato lo studio dell’attività del cervello umano. Da qui è avvenuto un radicale cambiamento nella tipologia di domande che gli scienziati si pongono sul cervello e dunque anche del nostro modo di guardare alle funzioni e al funzionamento del sistema nervoso. Un volta arrivati a capire che il cervello non è un cronista passivo di quello che succede nel mondo esterno, ma un partecipante attivo che usa la realtà fisica per creare il mondo che esperiamo, siamo anche giunti a farci domande che sembravano fino ad oggi troppo soggettive per essere oggetto di una vera e propria indagine scientifica. Questioni come i correlati neurali dell’amore, il desiderio, la bellezza, o il sostrato fisiologico dell’identità, l’empatia e le interazioni sociali sono tutte diventate materie di studio, specialmente dopo che è stato dimostrato che l’attività cerebrale corrispondente a questi stati, non solo può essere localizzata, ma anche quantificata, permettendoci quindi di oggettivare le sensazioni soggettive che proviamo.

Possiamo dire, senza troppe riserve, che l’acquisizione di conoscenze è il compito principale del cervello ed è eseguito, tra l’altro, in modo estremamente efficiente. Questa efficienza è dovuta, in gran parte, all’uso che il cervello fa di due tipi di concetti: quelli ereditati e quelli acquisiti. I concetti ereditati dunque, organizzano i segnali che arrivano al cervello in modo tale da attribuire loro un significato e quindi comprenderli. I concetti acquisiti invece sono generati dal cervello durante tutto il corso della vita e gli permettono di restare relativamente indipendente dai continui cambiamenti delle informazioni che lo raggiungono. I concetti acquisiti facilitano i processi di percezione e riconoscimento permettendoci di ottenere conoscenze su cose e situazioni.

Per capire come il nostro cervello arrivi ad acquisire conoscenze sul mondo che lo circonda le neuroscienze, negli ultimi anni, si sono date un gran da fare per evidenziare la specificità delle risposte cellulari di aree corticali differenti. Si è scoperto, ad esempio, che le cellule della corteccia uditiva rispondono a stimoli uditivi, quelle della corteccia visiva a stimoli visivi, e così via. Nell’affermare così strenuamente la specificità delle risposte cellulari di aree diverse del cervello, i neurofisiologi hanno però tralasciato un’altra caratteristica fondamentale: la capacità che queste cellule specifiche hanno di astrarre, dove per astrazione si intende il favorire le proprietà più generali a spese del particolare.

Guardiamo ancora una volta alla visione. Il sistema visivo che determina la percezione della forma ha una caratteristica sorprendente: nelle aree visive sono presenti cellule selettive all’orientamento, capaci cioè di rispondere solo a line orientate in un modo specifico. Queste cellule sono molto specifiche rispetto al genere di stimolo visivo che le fa attivare, ma astraggono in modo assoluto dalla tipologia dell’oggetto che genera quell’ orientamento. Una cellula che risponde a linee verticali risponderà ad una penna, purché presentata verticalmente, a un rametto, a una linea blu verticale su uno sfondo giallo, l’unica cosa che la interessa è che lo stimolo visivo sia orientato verticalmente, a prescindere da che cosa esso rappresenti.

Questi neuroni sono considerati dai neurofisiologi i mattoni su cui si fonda la percezione delle forme. Essi sono presenti nel cervello fin dalla nascita, almeno nelle scimmie, e rappresentano quindi un concetto organizzativo ereditario che determina come i segnali correlati alla forma sono raggruppati nella corteccia, quantomeno negli stadi iniziali del sistema corticale di elaborazione delle forme.

Le linee sono dunque davvero la base su cui si fonda ogni nostra percezione visiva, sono la base da cui scaturisce ogni possibilità formale. Paul Klee scrisse “disegnare è portare una linea a fare una passeggiata”. Riccardo Murelli ci costringe a passeggiare tra le sue linee, ad aggirarle, spinti dall’ossessione di riuscire a estrarre da esse un significato, di attribuire ad esse un senso. Percepiamo gli spazi vuoti delle sculture che diventano pieni sulla carta, cerchiamo dietro, sotto, sopra, cerchiamo nella nostra memoria, nel passato di esperienze precedenti, nei sogni, nei volumi architettonici, con la speranza che almeno la tridimensionalità ci parli. Nulla. Dobbiamo abbandonare questa idea, dobbiamo tradire il nostro umano istinto che ci guida alla ricerca di significati, verbalizzazioni, riconoscimenti, dobbiamo abbandonarci al silenzio e alla contemplazione. Allora scopriamo dove l’etica si fonde con l’estetica per trasmetterci l’unico messaggio possibile: il senso di quell’opera non è in noi, ma nella sua stessa essenza.

Noi esseri umani siamo naturalmente inclini a cercare di dare una forma a tutto quello che abbiamo intorno, riconosciamo sagome di oggetti nei sassi, negli alberi, nelle nuvole, estraiamo significati dai rumori più assurdi, sentiamo richiami nei fruscii delle foglie. Ma il vero senso di una forma non è il volto che diciamo di riconoscere nella nuvola quando guardiamo in cielo, ma sono le particelle d’acqua di cui essa è fatta, i cristalli di ghiaccio, il vento che la muove, questo solo è il vero significato di quella nuvola. Diamo una forma perfino ai sogni, alle emozioni, è l’unico modo che abbiamo per conoscerle, tenerle a bada, esorcizzarle. 

E come se tutto questo non bastasse, cerchiamo anche di riconoscere nelle forme da cui siamo circondati proprio quei sogni, quelle emozioni, quelle speranze. È la nostra condanna, la nostra smania, il nostro destino. Per questo, forse, l’arte è così potente, nelle opere d’arte riconosciamo empaticamente proprio le cose che più ci sfuggono, che sono così difficili da verbalizzare: illusioni, turbamenti, chimere, sentimenti, terrori. Mettersi di fronte ad un’opera d’arte diventa forse un modo per dialogare con se stessi. Mettersi di fronte a queste opere d’arte diventa un atto di introspezione, un modo per contemplare ed ascoltare se stessi, di raccogliere i pezzi della propria esistenza e ricomporre l’infranto.